Health & Wellness

Ivermectin: Neither great nor idiotic – Highlights COVID messaging fails

What is Ivermectin? Before Ivermectin was used as proof of idiocy or as an excuse not to vaccinate, we in pediatric emergency used it often. For pinworms. Or roundworms. It’s even been marketed as a single dose treatment for lice, hooray! But the rapid adoption for uses other than intended – and by this I mean a cultural flag to wave, not medical – reveals three conceptual errors in modern medicine. The biggest error comes from institutions misrepresenting science. The biggest error comes from institutions misrepresenting science. The CDC and WHO understandably demand complete certainty of facts before science goes up on their websites. When there is time to convene expert panels, and when iterative slight changes are made, this is fine. But that’s not science. Science can always change, constantly iterates, and sometimes flips on a dime. (Peanut Bambas snacks for allergy prevention, anyone?) By only allowing monolithic TRUTH on their websites, these institutions instilled a lack of respect for nuance and nimbleness. In contrast, the NIH has been majestic at synopsizing currently known COVID treatment possibilities. Hopefully, other institutions can learn. At the onset of SARS-CoV-2, many smart people pointed out that repurposing drugs was way cheaper than

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Health & Wellness

New Nasal Irrigation Study: Can it beat COVID?

https://youtu.be/BIZnOCUp_5YStarting nasal irrigation after testing positive decreased the risk of hospital admission – and how we can get the unvaccinated protected. Finally, a bit on Delta and kid hospitalization. The pre-print is on Med Archives now.

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image of hospital vaccination area
Health & Wellness

Update On All Things Covid

Dr. Baxter talks about Delta, Nasal Irrigation, & symptoms in the vaccinated. Nasal Irrigation Updates & Delta The countries where they do the most nasal irrigation have really low covid infection rates. Follow-up research on nasal irrigation shows that betadine is important as an ingredient in the solution used to rinse. Betadine is doing the virus killing while the other ingredients are doing the dilution and cleaning. New studies show a loss of grey matter in the brain. This could be what contributes to loss of smell, PTSD, and other long covid effects. The delta variant starts replicating quickly before hitting the bloodstream. It hits the brain, replicating, and erroding. This mechanism of replication takes a long time. It gives healthcare providers a window of opportunity to abate the virus. The accelerated time frame with the Delta variant is in part because it’s breathed in from the nose to the lungs. Decreased viral load with gargling is also an option that is beginning to get some support in studies. Treaments if you have COVID as updated in July 2021. Quercetin is an antioxidant found in natural food places. Zinc, which can be hard on the stomach so probably take it

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Health & Wellness

COVID in retreat – What do we do now?

Cases are low right now, but what should we expect going forward? About 50% of eligible adults are vaccinated. Last winter, we found that 48 degrees is the temperature at which COVID survives the air, so we have time until the weather gets that cold. In schools, only the people with organ transplants are not responding well to the vaccine, all other teachers can get vaccinated. And testing of vaccines on younger kids is showing 100% effectiveness. What else is going to happen in the fall? Vaccines are showing to be effective against the variants. The way mRNA vaccines work, they are going to be able to latch on and identify any variations in the spike protein on the coronavirus. What should we be doing now? Transmissibility changes drastically depending on the season. Right now we should start to increase ventilation in our spaces. We need to get aggressive about using UV light in ventilation. Replace old units so that air is circulating correctly. Currently, we only have half our population vaccinated. We need to figure out what’s going to happen going forward when vaccines are no longer subsidized. We need to figure out our game plan for boosters. Now

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Health & Wellness

Vaccine vs Infection & Teen Vaccinations

Dr. Baxter talks about what is going to give you longer-lasting immunity, getting sick, the vaccine, or both. She also breaks down the vaccine rollout for teens and pre-teens as Pfizer announces its opening up vaccines to those 12-15. Immunity: Catching COVID vs Vaccination Are you more immune if you caught COVID or got vaccinated? Well, when it comes to variants, antibodies in infected individuals were about 10x lower than those that got a vaccine. Natural antibodies do not last very long, especially in people who had only a mild case. However, the people who got sick and then vaccinated had the highest antibody count, supporting vaccination in either case. In nasal irrigation studies done in healthcare workers, the frontline workers got infected less than was expected. But the neonatologists did not. That’s because all of the other frontline workers were constantly being exposed to other mild coronaviruses, building up an immunity to other strains that aided their immune system and t-cells when interacting with Covid-19. The neonatologists only seeing small babies directly after birth in totally sterile environments did not have similar exposure to other coronaviruses. Vaccination for Teens When it comes to Pfizer approval for teens, should I

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Health & Wellness

Why isn’t the CDC intervening for needle fear?

Data on needle fear has been available for some time and experts like Dr. Baxter have been speaking about it but there’s been no response from policymakers. Dr. Baxter makes the case for why needle fear needs to be taken more seriously. Vaccines for kids 12+ are starting soon, and mandates are coming down, but needle pain is absent in the approaches. We went to a pharmacy to support vaccinations by addressing needle fear. We talked about FDA approval, differences in mRNA vaccines, and the science behind vaccinations. But we also brought chairs and tools like Buzzy to help make the process easier. There were 10 people that came because they wanted a handling of needle fear and pain. Only one person came asking about the science. The 10 who had their fears addressed got vaccinated, and the one had the science explained was not. Elsewhere in the world, addressing needle fear is a regular part of healthcare. Here in the US it is stigmatized with shame. We know that addressing needle fear works and that addressing vaccine skepticism is far less effective. It is more efficient to decrease some fear, or minimize some of the people who don’t come

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Health & Wellness

Needle Hesitancy: Here we are. Now what?

As supply for COVID19 vaccination in the US begins to outstrip demand, the impact of antivax sentiment is becoming evident. The associations with politics, socioeconomic status and education, however, miss the biggest – and PROVEN – cause of antivax sentiment. Needle hesitancy. In “The Big Chill”, Jeff Goldblum notes “when was the last time you tried to get through the day without two to three juicy rationalizations?” People old enough to have seen this movie most likely aren’t anti-vax. We Gen-X folk were born before kids were routinely given boosters at an age when it could be traumatizing. We dismiss needle fear because we don’t remember vaccines, only the rare Bicillin shot for strep, and assume we’re morally superior because we’re tough. But because society values toughness, if you ARE afraid of needles, you’re 3x more likely to decide that perhaps your fear is really because the vaccine is dangerous. A rationalization is much easier than being stigmatized. Anna Taddio was the first to publish that of the 23% of adults who feared needles, 7% said they wouldn’t vaccinate their children because of it. Around the same time, our team researching the Buzzy device for needle pain discovered that the reason for

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Health & Wellness

Do Glasses Protect Against COVID?

Dr. Baxter talks this week about Herd Immunity, and 2 studies: one regarding COVID deaths and another that looks at a link between wearing glasses and protection against the coronavirus.

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Healthcare Industry

News Updates from Dr. Baxter Feb. 17, 2021

Rather than live-streaming each Wednesday, I’m going to answer a question that’s come in, and give an ‘inside-scoop’ look into the exciting life of an Entrepreneur In Pandemic!  This week: Why we think schools are safer from COVID than FLU and A Week in the Life

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